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This is a very important read. I have read it twice…

When I saw the title of this lecture, especially with the picture of the scantily clad model, I couldn’t resist attending. The packed auditorium was abuzz with questions about the address; nobody seemed to know what to expect. The only hint was a large aluminum block sitting on a sturdy table on the stage.

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Twiggy’s rebate idea dead

But Mr Littleproud, said the proposal was dangerous and didn’t make sense. He said diesel users who didn’t use public roads should not have to fork out the excise to pay for maintaining them. “Why would you constrain an industry? Why would you take away its competitiveness and effectively take away its jobs? “And while Twiggy might be able to afford it, I don’t know whether every Australian out there that’s employed by some of these other industries can afford it and will want to see their jobs go because we’re not competitive.” Miners and farmers also slammed the proposal, saying it would cost investment and jobs because there is no widely available substitute fuel to power their operations.

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Industry ridicules Twiggy Forrest idea to divert diesel rebate into hydrogen

“Fuel tax credits exist to fix a serious distortion in the tax system,” Mr Mahar said. “Taxing farmers every time they start their tractor, pump or generator makes no sense. The proposal would apply a road user charge to fuel use that happens off-road in the paddock, on the water or even in hospitals. Agriculture Minister David Littleproud also ridiculed the idea and said the government had “no means in which we’re considering removing the fuel excise rebate.” “Twiggy Forrest is giving plenty of gratuitous advice from the sidelines and he’s been running around the world cashing a lot of Fortescue checks on hydrogen,” Mr Littleproud said.

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Gina Rinehart slams Federal Government’s green energy policies, warns of roadblocks to grow agriculture

The WA businesswoman highlighted in her speech ideas on how the Federal Government could assist agriculture, which included allowing farmers to clear their land to decrease the risk of bushfires, compensating for past clearing restrictions, and reimbursing past fines on farmers who had cleared land to protect their families, staff, pets and infrastructure. Ms Rinehart said as well as slashing red tape, the Government also needed to recognise “water was king” for agriculture.

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HARNESS THE DEDICATION OF OUR OLYMPIANS

The Courier-Mail columnist and Sky News Queensland editor Peter Gleeson spoke to Gina Rinehart, Hancock Prospecting Group’s executive chairman, about her continued support for Australian athletes and the country’s Olympic programs.

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McKillop to head Gina’s Hancock/Kidman operations

In the statement, Hancock chief executive Garry Korte said Mr McKillop had been charged with making the company’s agricultural division the leading agricultural business in the country. “We have made a head start, changing cattle care culture at Hancock, so that all our staff appreciate that, ‘happy healthy cattle are the best cattle’,” Mr Korte said.

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AGRICULTURAL LAND CLIMATE KEY

“We’re pleased to see that by avoiding regulation and taxes, the Government’s plan is a departure from the failed Kyoto approach which saw farmers regulated into footing the bill without recompense or recognition,” she said. “Instead, this plan recognises the hard work agriculture has already done in driving down Australia’s emissions since 2005. “It also recognises the tremendous opportunity that exists to use agricultural land as a carbon sink, by working with and incentivising our farmers to do even more.”

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Rowan Dean commentary | The Outsiders

Dean recalls 4.5 years ago in February 2017, former Federal Treasurer Scott Morrison held a black coal lump during a Parliamentary proceeding, defending its importance. He notes the PM is now saying addressing climate change is something that people need to do together. Dean says Morrison has done a complete 100% U-turn departing the previously rejected plan ahead of the Glasgow summit. He adds the climate conference is built on a premise that the world is getting warmer. Dean states it is in contrast with the figures provided by UAHv6 satellite measurements, noting the world’s temperature is exactly the same from 2017. He recalls Bill Shorten’s Labor Party promised 45% emissions reduction during the 2019 election.

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Piers Akerman: Net-zero emissions do not add up for Australia

Mining entrepreneur and Australia’s richest person, Gina Rinehart told The Daily Telegraph – which has been running an informative series on the topic and is committed to airing both sides of the argument – that the rush to curb greenhouse emissions without proper costing could imperil family farmers and cost taxpayers “billions in subsidies”. The precautionary principle demands that we know what the cost of buckling to the climate catastrophists at the UN’s Glasgow COP26 gabfest will be before we make any pledges.

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Solar a costly exercise: Gina

AUSTRALIA’S richest woman, Gina Rinehart, is warning that rushing to reduce greenhouse emissions without proper costings could imperil family farmers and cost taxpayers “billions in subsidies”. The mining and pastoral tycoon has outlined her particular concern that family farmers who have endured years of drought, bushfires and Covid-19 do not have spare cash, so cannot afford to invest to change to renewable energy. Mrs Rinehart said costings should be the first priority and urged the Federal Government to “stand firm” until these had been properly assessed and made public.

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Commodity exports boost trade surplus to record level

A 7.5 per cent lift in resources exports underpinned a 5 per cent monthly increase in the value of goods and services exports to $46bn, Australian Bureau of Statistics data showed. Rural exports also continued their strong run, lifting by 6 per cent in the month just shy of $5bn – 72 per cent higher than a year earlier. Wool sales jumped 12 per cent to $405m – more than double July 2020 sales – while meat exports lifted 8 per cent in July to $1.3bn, 26 per cent higher than a year earlier. Cereal and grains exports eased 2.4 per cent in the month, but at $1.2bn was up 230 per cent on an annual basis.

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